Blog Archives

Scots Whay Hae Reviews The Waves Burn Bright

It’s been a tough week for a number of reasons, some personal, some geopolitical, but some positivity was restored when this review of The Waves Burn Bright by Alistair Braidwood was posted on the Scots Whay Hae website. It previously appeared in print

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The Company and The Shogun Review

It has been a horrible week but I’m going to avoid going on about the referendum, I’m too upset and too angry and it’s probably best for all concerned if I keep that to myself for the moment. In the meantime

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Lian Hearn, Autumn Princess, Dragon Child Review

  My latest piece for the Japan Times is live now, a review of the second part in Lian Hearn’s The Tale of Shikanoko, Autumn Princess, Dragon Child. If you like your historical fiction shot through with fantasy, then this is a

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Scots Whay Hae! Podcast and The Herald Review

I thought the news was over for this week but no, on Friday morning the latest episode of the brilliant Scots Whay Hae! podcast popped into my itunes featuring my podcast debut. Recorded in a pub in Glasgow, it is an

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Sunday Herald Essay, a Glowing Review and a New Poem

Well, I’m back in Japan and bed-bound with a fever, no doubt worn out by all the travelling, reading, chatting and, dare I say it, drinking over in Scotland. While I’m lying here wishing for a swift and painless death

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The Waves Burn Bright Review: The Scotsman

The first review of The Waves Burn Bright is out and I’m delighted to say it’s a good one. The Scotsman said: “The night of the disaster is sensitively and evocatively handled.” and “Digging through a hard exterior to explore the layers

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Undiscovered Scotland Review

Another review of Silma Hill has been published, this time at Undiscovered Scotland. They describe the story as ‘in many respects timeless’ while it ‘leaves the reader asking questions about the nature of society and the role of religion and

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